Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Modifications by service branch
Post Reply
User avatar
Farrell Fox
G-Lieutenant General
G-Lieutenant General
Posts: 6557
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:17 pm

Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Farrell Fox » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:12 am

Source:
https://encrypted.google.com/patents/US2429732


File date is January 4, 1945

Image
Image
Image

ROOS

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Oct. 28, 1947. D. G.

SYSTEM AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING SUBMERGED INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES Filed Jan.- 4, 1945 Y INVENTOR. .FELMAH [Films BY v ' IIE -1- ATTORNEY 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Oct. 28, 1947. D. G. ROOS SYSTEM AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING SUBMERGED INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES Filed Jan. 4, 1945 Oct. 28, 1947. D c; ROOS 2,429,732

SYSTEM AND APPARAT'us FOR OPERATING SUBMERGED INTERNAL-COMBUSTION.ENGINES Filed Jan. 4. 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR. 1752114441? 7. 22005 Patented Oct. 28, 1947 S PATENT OFFICE SYSTEM AND APPARATUS FOR- OPERATING SUBMERGED ENGINES INTERNAL COMBUSTION Delmar G. Roos, Toledo, Ohio, assignor to Willys- Overland Motors, Inc., Toledo, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware I Application January 4, 1945, Serial No. 571,284 7 17 Claims.

This invention relates to system and apparatus associated with an internal combustion engine of an automotive vehicle of such a nature as "to render the engine capable of operation while immersed or submerged in water.

The invention embraces the system and apparatus for subjecting the interior of an engine crankcase to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure for the purpose of preventing or minimizing the ingress of water into the engine crankcase during the submersion of the engine' One of the objects "of the invention is the" provision of an arrangement wherein exhaust gasesfrom the engine are biased into the interior of'the engine crankcase under the influence of-pressure regulating means to predetermine a uniform gas pressure in the crankcase when the engine is submerged.

Another object resides in apparatus or closures for various adjuncts used with the engine, the

closures being suitably'sealed to prevent water; coming in contact with suchadjuncts.

7 Another object resides-in the provision of exhaust system for 'an engine where a portion of exhaust gases therefrom are biased into the interior of the engine crankcase to setup a super atmospheric pressure therein in combination with means interposed in an exhaust conduit to condense moisture or water vapor out of the'exhaust gases before the latter are introduced into the crankcase. s

A further object is the provision of apparatus in conjunction with an internal combustion engine whereby under normal operation the engine crankcase is ventilated by fresh air, the apparatus being so arranged that the ventilating system may be quickly discontinued and, a fluid pressure built up within the engine crankcase to render the engine adaptable for operation when submerged in water.

Further objects and advantages are within the scope of this invention such as relate to the arrangement, operation and function of the related elements of thestructure, to various details of construction and. to combinations of parts, elements per se, and to economies of manufacture I and numerous other features as will be-apparent from a consideration of the specification and drawing of a form of the invention, which may be preferred, in which: v

2 the forward portion of a vehicle illustrating the apparatus of my invention in conjunction with the vehicle engine;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the arrangement illustrated in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is aside elevational view of the engine, illustrating a form of apparatus for enclosing'and venting the carburetor and the arrangement biasing exhaust gases into the engine crankcase;

Figure 4 is a view of the opposite side of the engine particularly showing the arrangement of waterproofing the ignition apparatus;

Figure 5 is the front elevational View of the enginetaken substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 2 and illustrating the apparatus for bias- 7 ing exhaust gases into the engine crankcase;

Figure 6 is an elevational view of a. portion of the exhaust pipe for the engine illustrating a means for maintaining a predeterminedvamount of exhaust pressure in the exhaust system;

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view illustrat- "ing the pressure regulating means shown in Figure 6.

The system and apparatus of my invention is especially adaptable for incorporation in a vehicle used or useable for military operations, but it is to be understood that I contemplate the use of the system and apparatus of the invention with any engine or mechanism where it is desired to operate the same when submerged in water or 7 having a crank chamber l5 closed by a crankcase IS, the engine head being connected to the cooling radiator 13 by means of a tube H. A

4 water pump (not shown) is contained in a housing l8 mounted at the forward end of the engine, the water pump being driven by means of a belt [9 engaging a drive pulley 20 secured to the extremity of the crank shaft. The belt l9 engages the pulley 23 on the water pump shaft and another pulley 24 associated with the generator 'so that one belt drives the generator, the water pump and a cooling fan 25 carried on the end of the water pump shaft.

, As shown in Figures 1 and 3 a two part housing made up of members 30 and 3! serve to en- V close the ignition coil 26 and the ignition dis- Figure l'is. a side elevational" view showing Mtributor 21. The housing portion 30 is fixedly a of openings-66. the cylinder 65 is a plungeror weight 68 which is normally disposed in the lowenportion. of the cylinder as shown in Figure Land functions as a secured to the engine bloc, while the other housing portion 3| is secured to housing portion 36 by means of bolts 32 and wing nuts 33, there being a gasket between the juxtaposed portions of the housing elements 36 and 3|. The coil 26. is connected to a storage battery %35 .by suitable means (not shown). Th distributor 21 disposed within the two part housing is connected by suitfl nge. 51' formed on the upp ousing'element 52 which, with element 45 completely encloses carburetor 46 and its.associated'mecha'nism. A

gasket 53 is interposed between the juxtaposed N flangestn and t to form a water tight joint betweenv the housing portions45. andl52. "The thr'ottle linkage 42 is operatively connected with 1 thecarburetor- 46 and a bellows-like member 47 serves'to seal the passage of the-throttleponnection through the housing element 45.

The housingportionfl45 is formed to receive flanged extremity. '54 of. anfair intakeJpipe- 48 -which extends upwardly .and. terminates; in a semi-circular loop. 49...as particularly-shown. in Figure 1. Thus whenlthe vehicle issubmerg'ed,

the inlet opening of. pipe :48 atthe. loop: 149- will be above water level, the loop49 preventing rain,

snow. or theliKe enteringith lair intake. Positionedadjacent the intake manifoldJlS .isan exhaustwmanifold 55 having a. depending outlet 56 1 to which-is connected an exhaust pipe.58. Exhaust pipe or tube 58 passes downwardly and outwardly. beneath a portion of framefllll. and is --provided with a flanged fitting" 59 which. mates with a similarlyshaped fitting fillyformed on th A lower. end of an upwardly projecting extension 6| of the exhaust: pipe 58.

The arrangement is inclusive of means for set- --ting up andrregulating back pressure. inthe exhaust system of the engine for a purposeto be hereinafter-explained. This means is inclusive of I a cylindrically shaped housing 65- formed at the .lower portion of its perimeter with a. plurality Reciprocably vmounted within valve .to close the openings 66. AA comparatively weak expensive spring 69. is positioned between the upper end wallrof cylinder 65 and the plunger 68. Whenthe engine is in operation and exhaust gases are-passing through tubes. 58 and 6!, aback -pressure is built up inathe systembecause of-.the weight 68. --'When'the back pressure exceeds the adownwardly- -actingpressure ofthe weight- 68,

- thepressure-functionstoelevatethe weight or valve 58*so as to permitexhaust gases to escape into. theatmosphere through -the openings 66.

. As the exhaust gases are subject .to'thesuccessive impulses of discharged gases fromthe cylinclers of the. engine; the spring 69 serves to dampen .or. minimize flutteringof the valve or weight 68 .,under theinfluence of the pulsations in the exv.haust system. I Y I In order to prevent or minimize the ingress of water into the crank chamber and crankcase when the engine is in submerged condition, my arrangement is inclusive of means to bias or bypass exhaust gas from the engine exhaust system .intothe engine crankcase and chamber whereby apr'essure above atmospheric pressureis set up therein for the purpose of preventing water from vseeping in at the journals and through gaskets that may not be absolutely water tight. To this endafitting lZ is welded or otherwise secured to the exhaust qpipe 58, the fitting being in communication with a condenser or chamber 13 by means of a conduit or passage 14-. A manually :operatedvalve. or other effective means is associated" with passage 14 to control the flow of exhaust gases through passage 14. The con- "denser chamber i3 is provided with an outlet tube ...or passage 1"! which communicates with a fitting 7B, the latter being in communication with the crank chamber and crankcase of the engine. The condenser chamber i3 is for the purpose ofcon- "densing'outf'moisture Lentrained with'the ex- "haust gasesythe chamber being provided with a "drain'cock' Gil for drainingoff accumulated condensate. v

The fitting .18 isalsoin communicatiomwith a passage or tube 82'lea'ding into'the intakemanifold 43 the" tube 82*being provided with valve means or valved fitting 83. Thus communication may beresta'blished' by way offittings"18"and"33 ,and tube32 between the crankcase'chamberand theflintake manifold 43.

The engine is provided With an oil filler tubl85 having its entrance normallyclosed. and .sealed by means of acap-orlclosuretfi. .The upper member .52 ofthe carburetoriclosure. means is formed with. a. dome-like portion 88 which is connected I'toLthe oil.fi1ler, tube 85 by. means .of-..a .t ubeiorpassage 89. The tube .85isprovided-with. acontrol valve 90 forregulating or cutting. ofi c ommunication between the-oil filler tube, and the:

.dome 88.

The..arrangement=aof my invention is adapted for normal freshairventilation of-the crankcase and crank chamber and by manipulation of valve wmeans, thelengine may operate under Water in a satisfactory manner. Under normaloperation of "the'vehicle't-hat-is; when engine is not submerged in water,'-the valve 115' in the exhaustsystem is closedwhile thevalves 83 and 90;are inbpenposition. :Under these conditions,.-the carburetor is *supplied with air through-the tube 48,1 and-the :exhaust gases from therengine normally pass out through exhaust manifold 55, out1etz56;aexha,ust

.ap'ipes58 :and El, and through'the openings :66 in the.cylinder 55 mountedat the .upper end-of the exhaust tube '6 I, the pressure of the exhaust-serv- "ing to hold the plunger or valve '68 in'elevated or open position. As the valve 83 is in-open'ed position; the atmospheric pressure in the inlet manifold 43 with'which the passage "82 is incommuni- --cation sets up a subatmospheric "pressure condition within the crankcase of the'engine.- As'the -va1ve96 isinopenpositi'on, a suction or-subatmospheric pressure in the crankcase 'also exists inthe oil "fillertube-85 and 'passageilll leading ".into the carburetor closure formed by elements 45 '"and52. As the latter is'open to' the atmosphere through the air inlet tube48, fresh airmay'fiow through tube 48, passage C89, 'oil filler'tubeiB5, through the crankcase and. crankj-chainber 7 through fitting l8, passage 82 andipastjthevalve .63 .intothe inlet manifol'dg43 to ventilatethe en- 'gine crankcase and chamber with fresh air.

--W-hen it is desirable or'necessary todrivethe vehicle 1 through streams" or "under conditions where the" engine submerged or partiallyfsubmerged, the vehicle operator closes the valves '83 and 90 and opens the valve 15 iniheeghagst bypass or biasing system, With the structure in h s d m. hesri i e ex aust ga in u de a.... r ain re re. q pen 'en jrrqnjihfi weight ofthe plunger or valvefil portionspi the exhaust gases are bypassed orfb'iased through passage !4 into theconden'sing chamber lt wherein all or a large part of the moisturein the exhaust gas condenses, the moisture free ex; haustgas passing through passage 11 and fitting IBinto'the crankcase of the engine. "Thusiwhile the engineis submerged, thefreshjair ventilation ofthe crankcase does'n'ot function, but' partoi theexhaust gases from the engine arebiase d into the crankcase setting up a pressure slightly greater than that of the surroundingwater. The exhaust gases in the crankcase will escape outwardly along the journals and at any other points where water might otherwise seep into the engine crankcase or crank chamber wereit not for the increased pressure within the engine crankcase.

The amount of exhaust gas pressure setup is dependent upon the weight of the plunger 58 and the pressure spring 69. I have foundethatan exhaust back. pressure of. from three ,to seven pounds per square inchimpressed in the engine crankcase gives, satisfactory results vwithout-ma.- terially interfering with the functioningv of the engine. This exhaust back. pressure may, be variedby changing the weight of plunger .58 or the expansive pressure of spring 69 ormodifying both elements, whicheverlmay be. found to be most desirable. 1 Afterthe vehicle has crossed a stream and is in position to be operated normally, the vehicle operator: closes-theexhaust bypassvalve 15 and opens the valves 83 and93 to reestablish the normal ventilating system so that fresh air ventilation of the crankcase may be resumed. The drain cook 80 should be opened periodically to drainout the condensate that maybe formed in-the condensing" chamber 13w It is highly desirable that the moisture be removed promptly as internal combustion engine exhaust gases contain sulphur. and sulphurous compounds which readily combinewith moisture to form sulphuric'and'sulphurous acids, which'tare per se very corrosive or deleterious to metal parts;

It is apparent that, withinthe scope of the invention, modifications and different arrangements may be made other than is herein disclosed, and the present disclosure is illustrativemerely,

the invention" p h ding all. variations thereof. A I r WhatIclaimis: 1

1. In combinationwith an .internal combustion engine, a conduit for conveying exhaust gases awayfrom the engine: means'for creating an increase in' gas'pressure above atmo'sph'eric'pressure in said conduit, said means including avalve in said conduit; and means for biasing exhaust gases from said conduit into the crank chamber of the engine.

2. In combination with an internal combustion engine, a conduit for conveying exhaust gases away from the engine; valve means for maintaining an'exhaust gas pressure above atmospheric pressure in said conduit, and means for diverting a. portion of the exhaust gases from said conduit into the crank chamber of the engine.

' 3.;Asyst'em for'op'era'ting an-interna'l combus tion engine -"in"submerged condition which includes settingnp pressure in the engine" exhaust gaseenveymg means and of diverting exhaust gases iro'rr'Pthe"conveying means into'the engine crank-"chamber to create and maintain pressure therein above atmospheric pressure.

"4; A system for operating an internal combustion engine in submerged condition which includes setting up back pressure in the normal engine exhaust'gas conveyin means and of biasing exhaust gase into the engine crank chamber to raise and maintain the pressure therein above atmospheric-pressure.

- 5. A system for operating an internal combustion engine" in submerged condition which includes thebiasing of exhaustga'ses from the normal engineexhaust conveying means into the engine crank chamber to raise and maintain the pressure therein above atmospheric pressure.

6. A system for operating an internal combustion engine under normal conditions and when the engine is "in submerged condition which includes utilization of engine intake manifold subatmospheric pressure to circulate air through the engine crankcase under normal engine operation, and of means to divert exhaust gases from the engine exhaust system into the engine crankcase to set up superatmospheric pressure therein to adapt the" engine for submerged operationf "7; A system for operating an internal combustion engineunder normal conditions and when the engineis in submerged condition which includes utilization of engine intake manifold subatmospheric "pressure tocirculate air through the enginecrankcase under normal engine opera- 'tionyand' of means to stop air circulation through the crankcase and divert exhaust gases from the engine exhaust system into the engine crankcase to set up superatmospheric exhaust gas pressure thereinto adapt "the engine for submerged operation. 8. In combination with an internal combustion engine having an exhaust gas disposal system; of means including a passage in communication with'the engine crankcase to admit air therein; means in communication with said enginecrankcase for promoting a circulation of air therethrough; means for diverting exhaust gases from said exhaustga's'disposal system into the engine crankcase; and means for selectively div'erting exhaust gases into the engine crankcase or promoting the circulation of fresh-air therein.

9 In combination with an internal combustion engine having a carburetor and intake and exhaust manifolds; a closure surroundingthe carburetor and having an air inlet passage; a passage from saidclosure to the crankcase of the engine; "means communicating with said intake manifOIdY'for inducing the circulation of air through the engine crankcase'from said housing; an exhaust pipe'connected to said exhaust manifold; means for'setting' up a predetermined'exhaust"gas pressure'in said pipe; means for biasing exhaust ga'sesfrom said exhaust pipe into the engine crankcase; and means for selectively establishing the circulation of air through the engine crankcase or the biasing of exhaust gases into the engine crankcase.

10. In combination with an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust manifolds; means associated with said intake manifold for inducing the circulation of air through the engine crankcase; an exhaust pipe connected to said exhaust manifold; means associated with said 7 exhaust: pipe for setting 'up exhaustgaspressure therein; means 'forrbiasing exhaust gases from said exhaust pipe into the engine crankcase; and means for selectively establishing the'circulation of air-through the'engine'crankcase or the biasing' of exhaust gases into the engine'crankcase.

11. In combination with'an internal combustio'n 'engine having a carburetorand intake and exhaust manifolds; a closure surrounding the carburetor and havingan airinlet passage; a passagefrom said closure to the crankcase of the engine; means communicating with said intake manifold for inducing the circulation of air through the engine crankcase. fromz aid housing; an exhaust pipe connected to said exhaust manifol'dpmeans associated with said exhaust pipe for settingup' a predetermined exhaust gas pressure in said pipe; meansfor biasing exhaust gases from said exhaust pipe into the engine crankcase; said biasing: means including a condensing chamber adapted to condense moisture entrained in the biased exhaust gases; and means for selectively establishing thecirculationof air through the en gine crankcase or the biasing of exhaust gases into theengin'e crankcase;

12. Incombination with aninternal combustion engine having an exhaust gas disposal system; means for biasing exhaust gases from said exhaust gas disposal system into the engine crankcase toset up superatmospheric' exhaust gas pressure therein to adapt the engine for submerged operation; said biasing means including a condensing chamberadapted to condense moisture entrained'in the biased exhaust gases.

13. In combination with an internal combustion: engine having intake and exhaust manifolds; means'for conveying air to the crankcase of the enginey'means including a passage for establishing-communication between said engine crankcase-and the intake manifold whereby the=atmospheric pressurein said intakemanifoldcauses .a circulation of air through said crankcase; an exhaust-conduit communicating with said exhaust manifold for -normallyconveying exhaust gases awayfrom the engine; means forregulating the pressure-in said exhaust conduit; a passage for biasing-exhaust gases from said conduit into the engine crankcase; and means-for rendering ineffective the air circulation through'said crankcase-when exhaust gases are biased into the crankcase. a

14. The combination with an internal combustionengine having a carburetor-and intake and exhaustmanifolds; a housing for said carburetor; an. airtinlet conduit for conveying air into said housingpmeans'for conveying air from said housing-to the crankcase of the engine; means-including a passage for establishing communicationbetween said engine crankcase and the intake manifold whereby the atmospheric pressure in said intake manifold causes a circulation of air fromsaid housing through said crankcase; an exhaust conduit communicating with said exhaust manifold'for normall conveying exhaust gases away'from the engine; means for regulating the 8. pressure" in said exhaust conduit; a passage" for biasing exhaust gases fromsaid conduit into the engine crankcase; and means for renderin ineffective the air circulation through said crankcase when said exhaust gases are biased into the crankcase.

15. The combination with an internal combustion engine having a carburetor and intake and exhaust manifolds a housingifor said carburetor; an air inlet conduit for conveying air into said housing; means for conveying air from said housingv to the crankcase of the engine; means including a passage for establishin communication between, said engine crankcase and the intake manifold whereby the atmospheric pressure'in said intake manifold causes a circulation of air from said housing through said crankcase; anexhaust conduit communicating with said exhaust manifold for normally conveying exhaust gases away from the engine; means for regulating the pressure in said exhaust conduit; means for biasing exhaust gasesfrom said conduit into the engine crankcase; said biasing means including a condensing chamber adapted to condense Water vapor entrained in the biased exhaust gases; and means for rendering ineffective the air circulation through said crankcase when said exhaust gases are biased into the crankcase.

16.' A system for' operating an internal combustion engine under normal conditions and when the engine is in submerged condition, which includes the utilization of engine intake manifold subatmospheric pressure to circulate air through the engine crankcase under normal engine'operation, and of means to eliminate air circulation through the engine crankcase to adapt the engine for submerged operation;

17. In combination with an internal combustion engine having an intake' manifold and a crankcase, of means including a passage incommunication'with the engine crankcase toadmit air therein; means including a passage'in'communication with said crankcase and the' intake manifold for promoting a circulation of air through said first mentioned" passage and the crankcase; and valve means associated with said passages for eliminating the circulation of air through the crankcase.

DELMAR G. ROOS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division
M1A1 Main Battle Tank Mechanic
M88 Armored Vehicle Recovery Operator
AVLB Operator

Ben Dover
Gee Addict
Posts: 44248
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:37 pm
Location: Proving Ground

Re: Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Ben Dover » Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:47 am

For those new to this topic, this is not the system that was installed on Jeeps prior to the D-Day invasion, it is a more elaborate sealed and pressurized system.
One will note that there is another topic on G-503 concerning the Fording Valve Data Plate design and that coincidentally, the information contained on the M-38A1 Fording Data Plate WO 800537 is indeed the Patent Number for this deep water fording system.
2011 MVPA PIONEER AWARD - MVPA #1064
HONOR GRAD-WHEELED VEHICLE MECHANIC SCHOOL 1960 - US ARMY ORDNANCE SCHOOL(MACHINIST) ABERDEEN PG 1962 - O-1 BIRD DOG CREWCHIEF - 300,000+TROUBLE FREE M-38A1 MILES
LIFE MEMBER AM LEGION-40/8-DAV
7 MIL SPEC MAINTAINED MV'S
COL. BRUNO BROOKS (ARMY MOTORS) IS MY HERO

User avatar
Farrell Fox
G-Lieutenant General
G-Lieutenant General
Posts: 6557
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:17 pm

Re: Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Farrell Fox » Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:06 am

Ben Dover wrote:For those new to this topic, this is not the system that was installed on Jeeps prior to the D-Day invasion.

I think the 1945 filing date makes that pretty obvious.
4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division
M1A1 Main Battle Tank Mechanic
M88 Armored Vehicle Recovery Operator
AVLB Operator

Ben Dover
Gee Addict
Posts: 44248
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:37 pm
Location: Proving Ground

Re: Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Ben Dover » Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:17 am

And just when was this system put into production and on which Jeep Model.
We are not talking them being standard on MB/GPW. This did morph onto some post war Jeeps and then onto M-38//M-38A1.
2011 MVPA PIONEER AWARD - MVPA #1064
HONOR GRAD-WHEELED VEHICLE MECHANIC SCHOOL 1960 - US ARMY ORDNANCE SCHOOL(MACHINIST) ABERDEEN PG 1962 - O-1 BIRD DOG CREWCHIEF - 300,000+TROUBLE FREE M-38A1 MILES
LIFE MEMBER AM LEGION-40/8-DAV
7 MIL SPEC MAINTAINED MV'S
COL. BRUNO BROOKS (ARMY MOTORS) IS MY HERO

User avatar
Farrell Fox
G-Lieutenant General
G-Lieutenant General
Posts: 6557
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:17 pm

Re: Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Farrell Fox » Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:26 am

Ben Dover wrote:And just when was this system put into production and on which Jeep Model.
We are not talking them being standard on MB/GPW. This did morph onto some post war Jeeps and then onto M-38//M-38A1.
This system was never put into Jeep production. No one ever said they were standard. This system was designed around the G503, not the post war models you are trying to insert.
4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division
M1A1 Main Battle Tank Mechanic
M88 Armored Vehicle Recovery Operator
AVLB Operator


Ben Dover
Gee Addict
Posts: 44248
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:37 pm
Location: Proving Ground

Re: Willys Deep Water Fording Apparatus Patent Drawings

Post by Ben Dover » Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:53 am

Nice find, glad you found it to share. This was good reading then and is still good reading now.
2011 MVPA PIONEER AWARD - MVPA #1064
HONOR GRAD-WHEELED VEHICLE MECHANIC SCHOOL 1960 - US ARMY ORDNANCE SCHOOL(MACHINIST) ABERDEEN PG 1962 - O-1 BIRD DOG CREWCHIEF - 300,000+TROUBLE FREE M-38A1 MILES
LIFE MEMBER AM LEGION-40/8-DAV
7 MIL SPEC MAINTAINED MV'S
COL. BRUNO BROOKS (ARMY MOTORS) IS MY HERO

Post Reply

Return to “Jeeps used by: USMC, USN, USCG (-NO EBAY-CRAIGSLIST-COMMERCIAL SALES-)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests