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T223 Head Bolt Locations

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:41 pm
by dpcd67
Ok, back on my WC63; (I took two years off to do the M38).
I have two tapped head bolts, and the rest studs. The SNL calls for two bolts for my truck, number 12000 ish. I know one bolt goes on the right back end (passenger end near the fire wall) and the tapped hole holds a ground strap. I think I see that in the TM.
Where does the other bolt go and what is the tapped hole for?
Puzzling because my Power Plant TM only calls for one.

Re: T223 Head Bolt Locations

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:34 am
by Joe Gopan
Coil bracket?

Re: T223 Head Bolt Locations

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:17 am
by dpcd67
No, the coil goes on the steering column.

Re: T223 Head Bolt Locations

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:42 am
by Joe Gopan
And the WWII ORD 9's ain't much help.
You note your T-223 Engine has Cyl head Bolts, is it possible this is one of the 66 dated engines the Army ordered for export. M-37 also has bolts also and has a couple-three tapped bolts, but the locations are not the same.

Does it have the Twist type Oil Filler Cap?

I have a NOS T-223/T-214 Engine assy from that batch, they have all bolts, no studs, will take a peek later.

Re: T223 Head Bolt Locations

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 10:46 am
by dpcd67
Engine was all studs when I got it. It is a T223, wartime serial number of 28127.
I am going by the SNL which calls for two bolts. One I am sure goes at the right back for the ground strap. The Operators and Second Echelon maintenance TM and the Power Plant TM shows only one bolt. That is my question. I think, like some other things, they might have intended to use two tapped head, head bolts, but by the time they got into production, it was changed and the SNL stayed the same. I know how TMs are made; Tech Writers are a separate job series, (most TMs are written by the contractors making the systems) we have some very strict validation and verification of procedures and the managing spare and repair part lists (NSNMDR) is a job series of it's own. Still, with thousands upon thousands of parts for even one system, mistakes will happen.
For now I am going with one bolt.