A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

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kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sat Oct 21, 2023 1:46 pm

Hi all,

I decided to tackle the annoying fuel tank problems, that are part of the main suspect weakness of the re-build, i.e., the fuel delivery system. The fuel gauge sender unit was the first problem. With the tank removed, I took the unit out. It can be removed with the tank in place, but it is awkward. Also there are some tank repairs to be done.

This is what I found when I removed the unit from the tank. This is a poor quality repair I did previously which, obviously, failed. As I was handling the tank, there was a sudden clanging sound, like a sheetmetal plate had fallen over. But I had no clue what had happened. Until I looked inside the tank. The baffle closest to the sender unit had fallen to the other end of the tank! What? There are 15 - 20 spot welds holding it in place. Well, there used to be. :roll:
So this baffle had been flapping around inside the tank and had hit and damaged the sender unit.

Image


So I welded that back together and added a small brace welded across the join.
The next problem was a layer of fine rust 'dust' inside the unit. I had left it bare last time, it can't be a good thing.

Image


So after mechanical cleaning and re-assembling the pot (variable electrical potential resistor), I tested the electrical conduction of grease, which tested to be an insulator. Not only that, but contact can be made through a layer of grease. Cool! The grease will then prevent the corrosion and not interfere with the electrical function of the unit. So it got greased! In the picture below, I had greased the 'can' and installed the 'pot' on its' insulated card. The fine wire windings provide the variable resistance that makes the gauge function. Before assembling the base plate, I greased the windings as well.

Image


Another problem was the size of the opening to fit the unit into the tank, too small to use confidently. After considering a few options, I widened out the opening with a die grinder and a suitable burr and achieved a usable outcome with only a little bit of work. The distortion in the picture below is something I have not been able to fix, sorry. Anyway, the area between the 5 mounting screw holes was where I relieved the hole until I could fit the sender unit without undue stressing of the arms and brackets by having to squeeze them through a too-small hole.

Image


So here it is ready to re-fit. I had already tested it on the bench in the same way as back on page 39.

Image


And a close up of the pivot mechanism. Yeah, the welded arm looks a bit rough, but no one will ever see it!

Image


The next 3 pictures I took just because it is not something that is seen much.

First is the sender in the empty position, . . .

Image


. . . the half position, . . .

Image


. . . .and the full position.

Image

Cool!

The end of the pickup is about 30mm above the tank floor. I may extend that by 15-20mm, I am as yet undecided.

One more job done.

Have a nice weekend.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.


70th Division
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by 70th Division » Sun Oct 22, 2023 6:09 am

Hello Sam,

Looks great !!
Keep up your good works, any more trips planned with the truck ?
The last big one was really enjoyable to follow along :D !

Best Regards,
Ray

kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sun Jan 14, 2024 12:54 am

Hi everybody,
I wish you all well for this New Year.

I have managed to complete (for now) the fuel tank repairs needed.
Mainly the repair and fitting of the tank baffles. For the same reason that a fuel tank will rust out at the bottom (water, s.g.1.0 is heavier than petrol/diesel s.g.0.7), so the baffles rusted out at the bottom. What surprised me was that most or all of the spot welds had failed, damaging the sender unit when it sloshed about.

Here are the corroded baffles . . .

Image


. . . and the removed corrosion with the replacement sections ready.

Image


Before welding the sections, I put them in place to tack the sections together . . .

Image


. . . and then welded the sections in place.

Image


Finally the baffles were clamped in place and each spot weld (already drilled) replaced using the MIG welder.

Image


As per last time, I welded the panel back in place and took the tank to the radiator repair man who soldered it tight.

Image


Here the tank is fitted with the "shield" ready for fitting, which is a tricky maneuver including loosening and lifting the adjacent cabin mount.

Image


Repainted, it was set in a bed of silicon in a way to avoid the problems that I had just experienced. That is, packing the tank up about 3/8" (10mm) with small timber blocks, laying silicon everywhere else (after placing food wrap to stop adhesion to the rails), allowing it to dry for days, them removing the timber blocks as the tank would now lay on the dried silicon, and filling the gaps with the rest of the silicon. When all that was dry (days), all the excess silicon was trimmed and the tank bolted into place.

Hmmm, then the strap bolts were too tight. When nudged with a clamp, it was clearly too tight for the tank. I feared in may collapse. Too much silicon, I guess. Anyway, I fitted bolts that were about 3/4" longer, including drilling for a split pin in two of them.

Image


Eventually I got it all to go together to my satisfaction. I did not check the parts manual, so still dunno what the original length bolts should be. One day, . . .maybe.
It seems to be running well with no signs of any problems with the tank.
The initial tank repairs are on p.39.
One more job done.
Enjoy.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sun Jan 21, 2024 1:59 pm

Hello fellow industrial archaeologists,

I couldn't resist a post at the views count tripping over 200000!
It took 14 years.

It is a source of quiet satisfaction to me that this thread continues to be of interest and use (I believe) to many and varied.

Of the many things I have learned is that when approaching a problem repair that I have never done or don't know how to do, the most important thing is to make a start on it. This happened with the steering wheel. Yeah, I could have bought a NOS French copy, or sent it off to a professional restorer. But after attacking one part at a time, I now don't see a steering wheel restoration as much of a challenge at all, just some time and a few consumables!

It is my intention to continue this thread for as long as I use, maintain, service, repair and improve The Glorifier.

My thanks to the long time supporters and viewers from quite a few different countries. You have contributed to the richness of this resource. Appreciated.

Onward and upward.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Mon Mar 04, 2024 7:12 pm

Hello everyone,

In preparation for a run at Easter of about 300kms each way, I have been doing a few more repairs on The Glorifier.

One was a problem that developed while doing serious side pulls with the W45 and using the outrigger legs. One of the telescoping locks broke the handle and bent the handle shaft such that it was difficult to unlock the spring loaded pin to extend or retract the outrigger leg. The picture shows the lock jammed in the withdrawn position.

Image


Remove with grinder and cut-off disc.

Image


As it turned out, when I had a good look at it, . . . .

Image


. . . . . the 1/2" shaft (which holds the spring in place and mounts the handle) was bent. In use, the inner leg and outer leg create a shear-type action on the locking pin which in turn creates a sideways bending force on the 1/2" pin.

Image


Having originally used M.S. bar to make that shaft, it has proved to be not up to the task. I decided to use a H.T. bolt with greater strength to replace the shaft .

Image


After cutting the 1/2" shaft off the main pin, I drilled and tapped a UNF thread in the end and fitted a HT bolt, thread locking it in place. Cut it to length, and prepared a handle.

Image


Some time ago, I had several Holmes handles cast. So I drilled one of them to take the bolt shaft, then drilled a hole to take a rolled pin which holds the handle in place. Originally it would have been a solid pin but I find rolled pins to be an easier, reliable replacement.

Image


Time to assemble and test. Seems good.

Image


Tack welded the assembly back onto the outrigger leg and tested its' operation. All good, so proceeded to weld it in place, a final test (not under heavy load), then paint.

Image


The true test will be when I do a serious side pull.

One more job done.

Enjoy.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
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Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Mon Apr 01, 2024 3:31 pm

Ha! Ha!

Would you believe that I just found the nomenclature plate for the Glorifier!
Serial number is 969A6132 and D.O.D. is 22 March 1944.

Then, later I'm looking at the Homebush 969 truck (for sale) and checked the D.O.D. Would you believe it is 23 March 1944. Yes, the very next day!!! They are sister trucks!!

That sure got my attention!!

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

chibobber
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by chibobber » Mon Apr 01, 2024 10:09 pm

Life's simple pleasures! :D

kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sat May 11, 2024 12:46 pm

Hello all,

Oil leaks. Hmmmm, They stubbornly refuse to behave despite repeated attention.

So I attacked, again, the rear PTO selector shaft oil leak. This leak keeps the handbrake area well lubricated :roll:. I had a go at it a good while ago and seemed to have little effect at all. So I tried again.

This time I decided to remove the PTO and do the job at the workbench. So, firstly I removed the drive chain by splitting it at the master link, . . . .

Image


. . . to soak it in oil for a few days . . . .

Image


. . . and later drained it before refitting.

Image


Then by hanging over the W45 transmission, I could get to the bolts to remove it. The arrow shows the where the oil leak is.

Image


By loosening the selector fork lock screw, I could pull the shaft out of the housing.

Image


And this is what was left of the O ring I fitted at the first attempt. I don't know what caused this damage beyond a poor fit.

Image


So I put my thinking hat on and had an attack of the clevers. I recalled machining the O ring groove and then searching my O rings collection for a best fit. This time I found a suitable sized O ring and, using the lathe, I machined the groove to suit the O ring. Firstly, I brazed up the old groove. Brazing, AKA hard soldering, uses a copper/zinc alloy that melts before the steel shaft melts. By not melting the shaft, the process is a soldering process, not a welding process. Then machined a new groove based on the new O ring and allowing about 10% crush on the depth.

Image


The fit in the housing, which had worn to a 0.008" taper, seemed to be convincing. So refitted the PTO to the transfer case, but this time I approached it from under the truck, up and over the handbrake cross member, which was much easier than approaching it from above. I have since done a good 400 miles and there is not sign of a leak at all! Hooray! A win against an oil leak!! :o
This has given me increased confidence to attack a few other leaks sometime.

Enjoy.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
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Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Wed May 15, 2024 2:51 pm

Hi all,

Another problem I have attacked is a significant shake the windscreen frame develops at times. The source of the shake eludes me, however I suspect that it is caused by the stiff suspension system. The frequency of the shake is too slow for a drive shaft vibration and too fast for a wheel balance or brake concentricity problem. Also, the shake is not consistent, but may occur any time at low or mid speed. Sometime, I'll put several tons of something in the rear body to see if that stops the shake.

Anyway, an effect is the almost violent shake of the windscreen frame which is exacerbated by the hood mesh and inverter mounted overhead in the cabin. The frame lock brackets repeatedly loosened and it was a pain to tighten the #10 gauge bolts and nuts each time. So, . . . re-design time.

In the picture below, the green bracket is the original lock-down bracket with elongated adjustment holes. The #10 bolts were not up to the task, so I replaced them with 1/4" UNC bolts which required a slight widening of the adjustment slots using a square needle file.
The black bracket is 3/16"/4mm M.S. plate with threaded holes to match the holes in the dash. The extra piece is drilled with a clearance hole and tack-welded in place, and is needed because, behind the dash board, three holes go through the main cowl frame and one hole misses it.
The red arrow shows the original sized bolt, beside the new bolts.

Image


The black "nut" with the 4 threaded holes was 'blued' using a simple home process. It was de-greased, heated to a dull red then plunged into diesel sump oil. I believe the heating opens up the crystalline structure of the steel which captures then closes on the carbon in the oil as it cools. The effect is instant, requiring only the few seconds to cool the steel. Do this outside as it can produce smoke. It reduces rusting and looks quite good. If the surface is very smooth and clean, the effect is impressive.
Below shows the nut bracket being heated.

Image


Lastly, I drilled out the mounting holes very slightly over size (9/32" IIRC) to allow for some inaccuracy.

Image


And the finished job.

Image

Image


Now for a road test and we'll see how well it works.

Have a nice day.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
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Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sat May 18, 2024 2:10 pm

Hi all,

I had the chance to test the windscreen lock bracket repair described in the previous post.
The event was the annual Bundaberg car and machinery show, a 60ml/100km return trip which gave ample opportunity to test the effectiveness of the repair. It worked faultlessly, all was firmly secured as it should be. One more job done!
Also, just visible, is the modern fire extinguisher that I recently mounted to the outrigger leg. It took a while to decide on a suitable place to put it.
Thanks to Aaron for volunteering his jeep for the display and supplying the picture.

Image

Have a nice weekend.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

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YLG80
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by YLG80 » Sun May 19, 2024 12:50 am

Hi Sam,
Thanks for sharing your tips with so many photos.
I love that you are rebuilding so many parts and not simply replacing them with repros or NOS parts.
That’s artwork.
Keep up the good work and share your tips.
Yves
Ford GPW 1943 - Louisville - DoD 12-7-43
serial 164794
Yves de Ryckel

Marty, SoCal
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by Marty, SoCal » Mon Jul 08, 2024 12:28 pm

Could the shake you are experiencing be an occasional combination of each individual tire imbalance coming together at the same time? Meaning, each tire has a slightly different circumference and when all the imbalances all come together, as they do occasionally, the truck gets hit with a pronounced shudder.
43 Ford GPW 92098
53 Dunbar Kapple M100
Sold: 61 CJ-5, 41 T207 WC-1 Dodge closed cab pickup
MVPA #8266
USMC Tanker (1811, 1812), 85-93
ASE Automotive Master tech, former Chrysler-Jeep Level 4 Mastertech, CA state EA smog license

kw573
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Tue Jul 09, 2024 4:02 pm

Thanks Yves.

Hi Marty,

Thanks for the suggestion.

Whilst not dismissing that idea, I suspect that it is unlikely due to the frequency of the shake which seems to be 3 or 4 times the wheel r.p.m., but less than driveshaft r.p.m. I guess about 6 to 8 times per second. However, your suggestion would account for the apparent randomness of the shake. I have an unattached 1.2 ton forklift counter balance and a pair of forklift side counterweights of about 400kgs each, total about 2 tons, which I intend to load into the wrecker body to see if that makes a difference. Although I have had the front brake drums machined, I haven't taken the effort to balance any wheels, yet.

In the last year or so, the Glorifier has really, . . um, matured as a vehicle. What I mean by that is that it has proved its' reliability and there is no longer a long 'do list' of small or annoying things to address sometime. I can just jump in (+ oil/fuel/water check), start it up and head off without thinking of things that I should fix first or be apprehensive about its' reliability. Honestly, at this time, all I can think of that needs attention is a couple of oil leaks, the fuel gauge and a seat mount.

It is winter here and although mild by north American/European standards (6°C o/night), I do not function well in the cool and short days of winter, so not so much gets done and there are not a lot of events to attend either.

Have a nice day.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
MB-T trailer.
Diamond T 969. ('The Glorifier')
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. ('Clarrie')
Light Recovery Trailer (Ford?).
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

Marty, SoCal
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Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by Marty, SoCal » Tue Jul 09, 2024 7:18 pm

There are smart phone apps for vibration analysis, might help narrow down the source!

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/vibration ... d817385888
43 Ford GPW 92098
53 Dunbar Kapple M100
Sold: 61 CJ-5, 41 T207 WC-1 Dodge closed cab pickup
MVPA #8266
USMC Tanker (1811, 1812), 85-93
ASE Automotive Master tech, former Chrysler-Jeep Level 4 Mastertech, CA state EA smog license


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