A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

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kw573
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Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Mon Apr 26, 2021 2:00 pm

Good morning Diamond T devotees,

The re-setting of the springs was meant to be a 15hr turn-around job. It ended up being 10 days!
During the re-setting, where the individual spring leaves were re-shaped in a pneumatic (air) powered press, one of the main leaves broke! Good grief! I was unimpressed to say the least. :x
But upon inspection, two small cracks could be seen on the underside of the leaf, about 1mm deep and 6mm long. After I calmed down and thought about it, I realized that it was probably better that it failed now instead of in the middle of the Simpson Desert.

The spring works manufactured a new spring leaf using good quality Australian spring steel. This is important, as much of the steel used in Australia is imported from Asia and is 'cheap and nasty'. It also had the 'nib' around the centre bolt hole pressed to locate it on the adjacent leaf. So, an extra trip to Gympie to pick up the springs. And they are heavy, 49kgs each to be exact. After painting, I had some assistance to put them in place as I couldn't manage that by myself without knocking off a lot of the new paint. Once in place, I put a pin in the eye until I had the bushes fitted.

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It was then time to tidy up the old bushes on a bench grinder before fitting. You may recall that I fitted NOS bushes during the restoration, but they suffered huge distortion with almost zero driving. So, I re-fitted the usable old bushes, rotated 180 degrees, thus forcing the existing distortion back to a better alignment. The bushes seem to crack at the visible end, but are fine inside. So, I ground off much of the cracked rubber for a much more confident appearance.

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The two bushes need to be central in the spring during assembly as they will not self-centralize when tightening the shackle bolt, even when lubricated with red rubber grease. How do I know this? There is one I have to dis-assemble and reposition.

The U-bolt seat is easiest fitted after starting the U -bolts, which BTW, are not the same length. The longer ones go in the forward position. It is not in the way when starting the U-bolts, and drops straight into place.

Image

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The overall result is an moderate improvement in spring travel. Although I asked for a 40mm increase in set, it has resulted in only 25 - 30mm increase when fitted. The difference is obvious at the spring bump stops, but not that noticeable looking at the whole truck.

Anyway, I feel way more confident in the spring travel available for crossing over 1000 sand dunes soon.

Yesterday was ANZAC Day in Australia (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps), remembering our past and present service members. This is the first chance I've had to support the local parade with the Glorifier. A good day. (The picture is a bit rough, but the best one I've got.)

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Have a nice day.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.


kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sun May 02, 2021 4:22 pm

Good morning class,

I have several jobs on the go at the moment.
The cabin rear has been removed for access to the transfer case for a few repairs and the steering box has been removed also for oil leak repairs.
The steering box weighs 39kgs and has a reputation of being tricky to remove/replace due to how the cabin floor escutcheon plate is originally designed. Many trucks have this plate cut in half. I haven't done that . . . yet. :|

Having taken everything off the column in the cab, I removed the pitman arm and the 3 chassis mounting bolts. Now, I can pick up 39kgs from a bench top, but no chance under the truck. And there is not much room between the chassis and engine. So much so that I removed the fuel lift pump for a bit of 'wriggle room'. As the sector shaft goes through the chassis, the box had to be rolled upward as it was withdrawn from the chassis. As I was by myself, I laid on my back and moved it with my boots out and onto the top of the diff housing. It was at this stage that the box made an unforeseen roll onto my foot, trapping it in the 'V' between the spring and the diff center. Not bad enough to be painful, but, good grief, well and truly trapped. After a few minutes, I realized that there was a tyre lever within reach and I managed to pry the box up enough to get my boot out. It wasn't scary, but it did get my attention! :oops:
I could then slide the box out the front over the diff housing.
The actual oil leak was at the lower end where the housing is closed off with a sheet metal plate (probably pressed in place) which has the horn wire tube pressed into the center of it. I had previously attempted to seal it using a good quality silicon. Complete failure.

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So I drained out the oil, yes, oil! The side plate gasket and sector shaft seal are both doing their jobs well, so I don't want to disturb them. I then removed the old silicon, degreased the area, and sealed it with 'Epi-Glue'. This epoxy has given me good results with petrol/diesel leaks, so heavy oil should be no problem.

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While at it, I cleaned the column back to bare metal to remove the red oxide, then repainted it. We'll see how much of the new paint gets scratched off when fitting it. And I'll be using some sort of assistance to put it back!

Another issue is the front spring bushes. They are a fairly large rubber-type item that I guess was used to give flexibility to the front end, being a 6x6 truck. I had problems with NOS bushes being too soft, it seemed (see p.12). Anyway, I am running out of usable spares so went on the hunt for suitable material to make some replacements from. Bearing/engineering shops only had very rigid materials such as polyurethane, polypropylene and nylon. So I went to a trailer shop to check out some polymer springs, basically blocks of rubber that act as the spring. The manager suggested something that I had not even thought of, . . boat trailer rollers!!! They come in different materials and sizes. And cheap! We found one that was a hard-ish rubber, I could just get it to move a bit with heavy finger pressure, and was just a good size to get a pair of bushes out of it. AU$7!!

Fortunately, the problems with machining rubber weren't too much of an issue due to how hard this rubber is. But, a sharp tool is needed and I used a medium speed (600r.p.m.). It worked well.

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I had to open up the center hole from 3/4" to 1" using a freshly sharpened drill bit, some lube and the drill press. I adjusted the drive belt to be loose so that I had the grip by hand to stall the drill bit. Then fed the bush onto the drill bit holding it with both hands. I couldn't see how I could clamp the bush well enough without distorting it and so giving a wrong result. And yes, it did stall a few times until I had worked out how to control the feed so that it would cut rather than wedge and stall. Even then, I had to finish the hole with a die grinder. But it seems to have worked well.

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Then test fitted them.
Here is before . . . .

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. . . and after.

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I think they may be about 3mm too long, and, of course, we won't know how good they really are until I've done some test driving on them.

Until next time,

Have a nice day.

Sam
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Mon May 03, 2021 8:07 pm

Good morning MV enthusiasts,

Yesterday, I attacked the oil leaks at the transfer case PTO. Started by removing the PTO. There is a lot of oil on the hand brake cross member and hand brake below the PTO. I thought that most of it was from the PTO oil seal, but upon close inspection after removal, there is almost no oil leaking from there. Seems that it is coming from the PTO chain. It seems a poor design to me that puts an oily drive above such a critical component as the hand brake. I had the thought of putting a shield over the hand brake, but it would not likely be very effective. I may resort to regular degreasing.
Anyway, a definite oil leak was the selector shaft. Upon dis-assembly, I was surprised to find no oil sealing component at all!

Image


It is a slightly less than 1/2" shaft in a slightly larger than 1/2" hole. That's it!
I had expected to see a felt wiper in the hole, but no, nothing.
The two grooves are the 'engaged' and 'dis-engaged' detent positions. A detent is a spring loaded bearing ball that holds the selector in position once selected. That is why a gear shift will stay in place when you select a gear. The hole is for the grub screw that locks the selector fork to the shaft.

So it was a simple task, once I ground a good sized tool bit, to turn an 'O' ring groove in the shaft . . . .

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. . . and fit an 'O' ring.

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Technically, the shaft was 0.495" dia. and the hole was 0.510" dia. The 'O' ring was 0.067" cross sectional dia. So allowing about 10% crush, I machined the groove to be 0.047" deep.

It went together nicely and the PTO has now been re-fitted.

One more job done!

Enjoy.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Tue May 04, 2021 2:24 pm

Good morning curious observers,

I managed a reasonable day on the Glorifer yesterday.
The top of the transfer case received some attention. The input shaft had both a rattling slinger and a leaking oil seal. As the companion flange is on a taper, I needed to use a puller. Fortunately, I had one that was both small enough to fit in place and strong enough to do the job.

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Below is the slinger that had a rattle to it, hopefully it is the rattle that is driving me nuts when driving.

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The slinger should be a simple medium drive fit (= hammer on/off), so I ran a small weld bead around it to shrink it about 0.010" which worked fine.

Image


Then, the seal/bearing housing was removed to replace the seal and check out the seal surface on the shaft. The seal that came out was 1/2" wide, but I fitted a 1/4" wide seal as that is what I could get locally. The housing, below, still has the old wide seal in it.

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When re-assembling the shims, I cleaned each one and used a light smear of Locklite 515 flange sealant on it. I have previously wondered how to seal shim packs, but am confident that this product will both seal and not interfere with the shims spacing, and is not too messy.

Here, ready to fit the housing, some plastic tape is used to cover the keyway to avoid damage to the seal when I slide it into place. The shaft had a good smear of oil to lubricate the seal during fitting.

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And all re-assembled ready fit the drive shaft. In the picture, at the far left, the red-ish Locklite can just be seen squeezing out of the shim pack. All the mounting bolts and holes were cleaned and I used thread sealer on the bolts as they are 'through' holes.

Image


One more job done.
Have a nice day.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Wed May 05, 2021 2:41 pm

Good morning fellow industrial voyeurs,

The steering box has been re-fitted. It was easier to fit than remove because I was a bit smarter about it. The Kenworth provided a 'sky hook' from which I hung my workshop chain block and attached it, via a rope, to the box down through the top with the bonnet (hood) stay unclipped and the bonnet laid back onto the other side bonnet. I used the chain block as it would give me good control. And the rope was less likely to damage anything in the engine compartment that it rubbed on. I had to remove a couple of pipes, but it worked well. Here it is ready to have the rope attached. The cardboard protection can be seen.

Image


So, raise a bit, feed the column, raise a bit, feed the column, etc. The only problem was that I forgot to feed the column into that pesky escutcheon floor plate and the cardboard wouldn't fit in it either.

Image


Anyway, it went into place without a lot of trouble. Had to take the trailer brake control off its' pipework to fit the escutcheon plate. Putting a wooden block under the clutch pedal to hold it down helped a lot and the brake pedal is easy to hold down by hand. I also removed the exhaust pipe completely and, later, fed it into place just before screwing down the plate. This exhaust pipe doesn't connect to anything below the floor boards, it is just a air dump exhaust pipe.
And, yes, I did need to do a bit of paint touch up when finished. I'm going to use the same oil in the box again. It came out clean and is doing its' job well. Now, to put all the pipework and PTO shaft back on.

One more job done.

Have a nice day.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Sun May 09, 2021 8:27 pm

Hi Mechanical masters and apprentices,

My annoying chase of oil leaks continues.
Having resealed the rear lower bearing cap on the gear box, I did the same with the front and rear bearing caps on the PTO. These bolts are all in 'through' holes, so the threads need to be sealed. But, the PTO holds oil after the box has been drained and needs to be drained separately. The TM says to use one of these lower bolts to drain the PTO but this has a minor problem (some oil remains) and a bigger problem which is that the bolt hole thread remains at oil level and so can't be properly degreased to apply a sealer. They subsequently leak. So, I have for a while been going to put a drain plug in the PTO, but not got a round to it. Now, at possibly the least drain in years, I get to it!!! :lol:

After consulting the parts manual, I guessed the lowest point and drilled a pilot hole . . . .

Image


. . . . tapped a 1/8"NPT thread (1/8" is the nominal ID of the pipe used with this size fitting and NPT = National Pipe Tapered. BSP = British Pipe and is very similar eg 27t.p.i. vs 28t.p.i.) . . . .

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. . . . and fitted a brass plug.

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The selector shaft on the PTO was a bit damp and I had wanted to fit the leather boot I had made 10 years ago. I needed to glue a 1/4" tank bolt . . . .

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. . . . on the end to hold the end of the boot.The dampness was more than I want to deal with at this stage. Anyway, the boot finished off the PTO nicely.

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There is one oil leak left to do on the gear box and it can then be filled with the new oil.
Waiting on some new seals to arrive for the transfer case and front diff.
Then it will the involved front wheel alignment modification that should solve several front end problems.

More jobs finished.

Have a nice day.

Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Mon May 10, 2021 1:53 pm

Good morning technical voyeurs,

The pinion carrier has been assembled and fitted to the diff housing. Waiting on the new seal to arrive.
The reason I removed it was to re-seal the shims that position the pinion on the crownwheel and to checkout the seal surface as the seal was leaking also. My previous efforts to seal the studs were mis-guided, as they turned out to be blind holes! :oops:

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I was a bit confused by the design of the pinion nut. My experience is that the pinion nut is the tightest nut on the vehicle. I recall the rear diffs pinion nuts needed over 1000ft.lb. of torque. Yet the front diff nut can only be tightened by two 1/4" engaging holes. 1/4" pins would fail long before the 1 3/4"UNF nut was anywhere near its' needed torque, I thought! The nut + locknut can be seen in the picture above, and below, they are with the lock washer. I wonder if I damaged the seal on assembly (very easy to do) by forcing the lip across the locknut/lock washer/nut junction. :oops:

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So I made a tool to tighten these nuts.

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It is a steel plate which I turned a 1 3/4" (+ a few thou.) hole in the middle and with two high tensile 1/4"UNC bolts threaded into it, locked in place and then cut to length to engage the nut precisely (red arrow). I then needed to hold it in place because as soon as it starts to move out of place, its' strength is greatly reduced. So I made a collar (blue arrow), found a washer (yellow arrow), and put the companion flange nut on top of it all to hold it together.

Image

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The clamp is to hold it on the vise. The pinion has a (tapered :?:) hexagonal recess in the inner end which I located on a good-sized bolt welded to a mounting plate held in the vise.

Image


This allowed me to apply a good amount of torque, I'm guessing around 200ft.lb.
The carrier was then refitted with cleaned and sealed shims.

Enjoy.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.

kw573
G-Lieutenant Colonel
G-Lieutenant Colonel
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Near Bundaberg, Australia.

Re: A 969 rebuild from Downunder.

Post by kw573 » Wed May 12, 2021 3:11 pm

Good morning MV followers,

Next was the pinion seal. I bought one by size from the local small-town parts shop and tried to fit it using a good sized pipe in the arbour press . . . .

Image
'

. . . but it would not seat properly. I put it down to the grip of the polymer coating on the seal. The seal housing distorted before seating, so I turned the lip in front of the seal off the housing to have access to the outer side of the seal and press it back out. I then straightened the seal housing using the arbour press, lubed the seal housing with 'Stag' sealant and this time it went home with little problem.

Image


Next was how to protect the seal lip from the edges of the nut/lock washer/lock nut during assembly. See arrow below.

Image


So I wrapped it with plastic insulation tape, . . . .

Image


. . . . oiled it and slid the seal housing into place with Loctite 515 as the gasket.
Just a technical comment here - the colour of the plastic tape is not important unless you are trying to impress someone! :)

Image


Also, in the picture above, it can be seen where the lip in front of the seal has been machined off the housing, giving me access to the front of the seal and to be able to remove the tape after assembly. It was then a simple task to fit the companion flange and the drive shaft. Now, the companion flange on the transfer case is within 2 degrees of parallel to the companion flange on the front diff, well within accepted tolerances.

Almost done!

Have a nice day.
Sam.
1942 Script GPW (Daily driver).
Diamond T 969. (The Glorifier)
Diamond T 969, rusty, complete, for sale.
Kenworth M1A1 Heavy Wrecker x 2.
M2A1 white HT. (Clarrie)
Light Recovery Trailer.
3ton GS (Blitz) Trailer.
150gal water tanker trailer.
Air compressor trailer, 100c.f.m.


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