What to do?

1941 - 1945, MB, GPW modifications, sugestions, and ideas, official MWO's and unofficial WWII field mods NO EBAY or COMMERCIAL SALES.
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Ez8
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Re: What to do?

Post by Ez8 » Sun Jul 26, 2020 11:16 am

These jeeps are the essence of a vehicle, there is nothing on them which is frivolous. That being said, they are extremely easy to work on and if the motor turns over getting it started will be easier than if you needed to rebuild it.

Where are you located? There might be a G503 member near you.
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Wolfman
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Re: What to do?

Post by Wolfman » Mon Jul 27, 2020 5:45 am

I would be curious to find out what condition the engine is in.
You don't have to completely restore the jeep, just to hear the engine run or even take a compression test.
Just hook up jumpers to crank the engine over and maybe get it started.
On that thought, it has been sitting a while.
A compression test up front would most likely turn out pretty sad.
Maybe a compression test first.
Then see if you can get it started and run a bit.
Then a second compression test for comparison.
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Limmkr
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Re: What to do?

Post by Limmkr » Mon Jul 27, 2020 7:07 pm

I'm near Sacramento. I'll get someone over for a compression test.

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JIMN
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Re: What to do?

Post by JIMN » Tue Jul 28, 2020 3:03 am

So if it is just going to put around town and maybe back an easy trail in the woods, you can have an easy time with getting it going.
I would just stick with the original drive train (even if you swap in a better flat head 4cyl) but upgrade it some. Put a 12 volt alternator on it And have 12volt safe lights and turn signals front and rear. Add a better master cylinder and disc brakes to the front, and get some Cj drum brakes for the rear they are easier to maintain. For simplicity just run with the rest somewhat original for a while.
As time goes by and you find you want to upgrade things it is “relatively“ easy to do it at any point.
Yep, took it apart too long ago, and now can’t remember everything.....
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Chuck Lutz
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Re: What to do?

Post by Chuck Lutz » Tue Jul 28, 2020 12:07 pm

Plan A = repair, replace, restore existing WWII running gear and body
Plan B = replace motor, trans and possibly transfer case and restore WWII body

Here is my opinion, worth exactly nothing but is based on my own experiences and watching the mistakes made by others here on the gee and in person when seeing what guys have actually paid good money for.

You have most of the components original to the jeep. I assume (whew!) you will only want to cosmetically restore the tub, so you will spend most of the money or repairing and restoring the running gear in there now. This of course is subject to how much of the work YOU can do as opposed to that which you send out to be done.

Either way you go, you need to deal with brakes, steering, tires, cooling system, fuel system, new wiring system, lights, glass and canvas (or a metal top). In Sac I doubt a tin roof would be comfortable and your driving would be in good weather anyway. So....add up all that on one separate list.

Now, the driveline...engine? If you do some of the work you might be in it for $2,000 or $3,000. If you send it out, maybe $5,000 or more. If you bought a "modern" engine that actually FIT into the jeep without bashing in the firewall, you probably will spend $2,000 or $3,000 anyway.

Trans and transfer case? Again, if you do the work, the parts will set you back a couple grand but if you purchase some with the "modern" engine you probably spend another $1,000 or so anyway.

See where I am going with this? You already HAVE a driveline you can rebuild that FITS, has no steering work-arounds, no exhaust or installation issues so you KNOW it will go back in easily and cheaply.

Or....sell it to a person who wants to all this above and either buy one that is already restored, or buy a CJ and paint it OD and add a couple stars and a USA number on the hood and most people will believe it is a "WWII jeep" anyway. Besides, you get a heater, electric wipers and much more comfortable seating.
Chuck Lutz

GPW 17963 4/24/42 Chester, PA. USA 20113473 (USA est./Tom W.)
Bantam T3-C 1947

Limmkr
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Re: What to do?

Post by Limmkr » Tue Jul 28, 2020 8:22 pm

Ok Chuck, this is the advice I was looking for. So enlighten me on transfer case issues. If I put in a newer 4 cyclinder, am I needing to replace both trans/TC? No adaptor type scenario? For the body, I'm only looking to get the rust out/repaired, and paint it, I'm not looking for perfection. I probably will do a canvas top, only out in decent weather. I see there's a section called JeepDraw with all kinds of schematics, I assume a must read if I'm keeping original mechanics?

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Re: What to do?

Post by Marty, SoCal » Thu Jul 30, 2020 4:34 pm

The t-case will handle the power of a more modern engine, the transmission is the weak link (if it's the original T-84). The rear axle shafts are a bit weak also and won't handle much more power than the stock engine makes.

Expensive adapters will be needed if you substitute a modern transmission, Advance Adapters and Novak make them.

An adapter will not be needed if you substitute a T-90 3 speed from a '46 and later CJ or M series jeep, but mods will need to be done to the face of the t-case to allow it to bolt up, the front transmission face area of the t-case will need milling to clear the cluster and reverse gear shafts that stick out on the back of the trans in a different location than on the T-84.

Advance Adapters and Novak sell adapters to fit the T-90 to more modern 4 cylinders. It used to be popular to install Pinto 2.3 and 2.0l or Chevy II pushrod 4 cylinder engines. They fit well.

There's now a guy that sells adapters to install a Kubota Diesel engine to a stock T-90 type Willys bellhousing, Overland Diesel Conversions:
https://www.overlanddiesel.com/conversion_kits.html

it needs to be the later type large bellhousing, from a 53 or later model CJ or M-38A1 and the T-90. These engines offer about the same HP as the Willys (60 HP) but a lot more torque, especially if you intercool and turbo it. People get almost 30 mpg with the conversion. Engine weight is almost the same as the flathead Willys, too.

A stock WW2 jeep will wheel really well on mild to moderate trails. I've driven mine all over the So-Cal region in the mountains and deserts, on some pretty rough trails.

For mods that will make off-roading easier, You can add in a Dana Powerlock differential/s to the stock Dana 25/23 axle/s which will greatly increase traction for the trails. Hard to find one since it's no longer made but Herm the Overdrive Guy usually has a rebuilt one in stock. sometimes one will pop up on e-pay.

Lockright makes a drop in spider gear replacement set that basically acts like a Detroit Locker that fits the WW2 jeep also, but it has harsher qualities than the Powerlock limited slip unit. Easy to install as there is no change to the axle ring and pinon gear shimming:
https://www.amazon.com/Powertrax-2110-L ... B00IVQNYKS

If you can find early CJ-2A t-case gears for a case with a 3/4" intermediate shaft, they offer a lower 2.43-1 ratio than the WW2 gears at 1.98-1, they will bolt right in with no mods. The whole CJ-2A, 3A, 3B, M series t-case can be installed as is since they came with the T-90. These are better t-cases that have a larger intermediate shaft for longer life. The internal expanding e-brake is better than the WW2 external band type e-brake, too.

One more mod that is great for off-roading is adding an overdrive to the Dana 18 T-case. It allows you to split gears plus reduces the RPMs in top gear by 25%. It may even come with a T-90/Later Dana 18 craigslist find if you get lucky! They were pretty common on CJ's. Here's a link to a post I made about my Overdrive:
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=164205&hilit=overdrive

Hope this helps!
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Chuck Lutz
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Re: What to do?

Post by Chuck Lutz » Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:54 pm

Oh yeah...when you say "put in a newer 4-cyl" then you will probably NOT be installing a flathead like the L-134. You will probably be installing something like the CJ series F-134 which is overhead valve design and as such, is a much TALLER engine and the CJ had a TALLER hood to accommodate it or you just cut a big round hole in your valuable WWII hood, turning it into scrap metal so you can mount some chrome air cleaner on the carb.

You need to decide NOW if a WWII jeep is what you want or if you intend on tearing everything out under the hood and going with another 4-cyl engine with not much more HP anyway.

1) Leave it as is and rebuild everything and have a WWII jeep.
2) Rebuild the L-134 and have a reliable engine or find a take-out "newer 4-cyl" and pray it won't blow up in 6 months or a year and cost just as MUCH to rebuild (if it can be rebuilt) as you would spend on the rebuild of the L-134
3) Dump in a "newer 4-cyl" and disc brakes, etc., etc., etc. and spend money you won't get back as the WWII version is worth MORE money anyway.
4) Sell it and find a CJ with a "newer 4-cyl" and a T90 and then think about disc brakes and the rest of the things you are interested in.
5) Just buy an already restored CJ with all the bells and whistles you want and DRIVE IT NOW.
Chuck Lutz

GPW 17963 4/24/42 Chester, PA. USA 20113473 (USA est./Tom W.)
Bantam T3-C 1947

ndnile
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Re: What to do?

Post by ndnile » Sat Aug 01, 2020 4:24 pm

Chuck Lutz wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:54 pm
Oh yeah...when you say "put in a newer 4-cyl" then you will probably NOT be installing a flathead like the L-134. You will probably be installing something like the CJ series F-134 which is overhead valve design and as such, is a much TALLER engine and the CJ had a TALLER hood to accommodate it or you just cut a big round hole in your valuable WWII hood, turning it into scrap metal so you can mount some chrome air cleaner on the carb.

<--snip-->
You can use a Holly carb on the F-head and then you don't need to cut the hood. I bought a GPW with this setup. I think the carb was for a Ford Falcon.

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